Winning an Espey

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Winning an Espey

Helen Sullivan, editor

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Jackson Espey is an award-winning cinematographer who has a undying passion for making movies and short films.  Raised in in Minnesota, there was not a whole lot of opportunities for this aspiring Scorcese to grow as an artist.

Like any nine-year-old boy, Espey was obsessed with Star Wars. He began to watch behind the scene videos of how the movie was made. Ever since then, his passion was ignited.

He went on to explain that ” a shot of the spaceship flying through the sky using miniatures and that was crazy to me because I was like I could do that and I began making those videos and that was kind of a turning point for me.”

At the age of fifteen, Espey made his first wedding video when his mother got remarried. From there on out people began to approach him about his video makings.

“I think because I’m coming from more of a low budget, I think it’s a little more personal,” he went on to explain his style, “like if you watch my wedding video it talks more about the couple instead of flaunting quality. It’s more about substance over equipment.”

With all of the support in the world, his mother made sure to help Espey in anyway possible, even if that meant movie across the country.

“One of the main reasons my mom moved out here was for me to get closer to film,” Espey said.

“When I moved here from Minnesota, I hit the ground running and joined as many film classes as possible, shooting as many wedding videos just to get a bunch of projects under my belt just to have something to show to film schools and get something underneath my name.”

Espey is involved in various film classes and programs but currently most of his time goes into PitchNic. This extensive nine month apprenticeship helps kick start aspiring film students’ careers and put them on the path to success.

“PitchNic is a nine month film apprenticeship where you create a short film,” he explained, “I made a short film called Miguelito. It’s a coming of age story. A lot of the films last year that were in PitchNic went to Arts Fest so that would be cool. My biggest hope is to get into Sundance Film Festival as a short film.”

Espey hopes to attend USC or Chapman University to further his film career and become the next Martin Scorsese. He would also like to add, “I would like to make bigger narrative films, not block busters but more independent films. Also, be sure to check out Miguelito on Vimeo!”

 

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